Pipe Ruler

Pipe Ruler

How does a young math student come to grasp a mathematical concept (like a straight line), such that they easily recognize it‘s form when they see it. Learning the basics in Mathematics, in part, begins with developing learning to see and describe the real world in terms of ideal mathematical concepts. The second is the mechanics of mathematics (problem solving). This abstract idea at work concept with some have difficulty recognizing radii in the world around us like they have no sense of radius. We might not recognize the roundness of a corner as a radius.  Consider the Mechanical Engineering professor who read the material I sent, but didn’t “get it” until after he saw a radius ruler used to measure a curve (his words). I‘ve seen that same “sudden realization” reaction time and again. The proto-type(s) are how the educational version could be made. They’re made from paper and tape, but they work on adults, so why not in the classroom. Some are a little more accurate than others. We’ve never been able to directly measure a curve like this before.  The radius ruler is an innovation so fundamental; it’s only comparable to something like the protractor as a basic learning tool. We want to bring the radius ruler to students as a learning tool because it’s just as significant as the ruler and protractor in helping them learn the basics of math. It complements the ruler and protractor by covering that part of the basics they don’t cover.  From Cartesian and Polar coordinates (and from math generally), 3 basic terms are used to described all things are described in by some combination it’s clear that some sense of length, angle, and radius are key to students understanding the basic concepts. Children aren’t born knowing anything about this, and concepts of length, angle, and radius are abstract ideas initially. They don’t have any sense of inches or degrees, let alone the roundness of a corner.

            Educators found that children learn more when more of their 5 senses are utilized during the learning experience. They gave students a ruler and protractor, and had them measure things. The length measurement required taking the ruler in hand, using eye-hand coordination to line the ruler up with the thing to be measured, and then interpret the graduated scale on the ruler to read the measurement. The hands-on experience from making the length measurements gives them the experience required to develop a sense of length. The same is true with using a protractor for making angle measurements to develop a sense of angle. The significant benefit from this approach is well known, and now comes.  Although greatly improved, children still struggle with the basic concepts because they still struggle with the concept of radius. Like the 3 legs of a stool, understanding math requires some sense of all three of these basics (length, angle, and radius). Children still struggle because there wasn’t anything comparable to the ruler and protractor for that hands-on experience with radius (until now). This basic innovation means students can now get the significant benefit from using a radius ruler for making radius measurements to develop a sense of radius.  We know from talking to some educators we’re right about the benefit to students. This form is accurate enough for teaching purposes, but cheap enough for every student can benefit from it. We have received a letter of recognition for the Board of Education for the Radius Ruler, and I am very pleased. It only took 10 months of hard net-working, building a web-page and a facebook page for the Radius Ruler. We are working very hard to get the Radius Ruler as part of the Common Core, attached is the letter from the Education Board and letter from the National Math and Science Foundation. It has been a long road, but we know that this is the first teaching/leaning tool for mathematics is a very, very long time. There is a really good story that follows this new ruler and it really helps a student grasping the concept of radii. We have a few math problems that may come with it, but at first, were thinking the 5th grade, use the Radius Ruler as a project.

           Any teacher or student can go to radius ruler.com and copy, paste, print and build their own ruler, and it’s FREE to everyone. We will keep it free until the patent is up. Please go to the site or facebook page and check it out yourself. We need someone that will check it out and do some research to get it in the Common Core Standard. I have gone to the web-pages that Janice Brooks gave me and both of them are not in use. That’s not going to stop us because we have faith in this new way of teaching/learning program that our Country. This time of our Country’s education program reform will be a major part of our history and want to be a part of it. Thank you and please look at the attachments documents, and let me know what you think or were should my next move be.  Since this new teaching/leaning tool was conceived in Mobile, Al. We think the States Education Boards should be the front runner in using the Radius Ruler. After 10 months of networking the ruler has been recognized by The National Board of Education and endorsed by The National Science Foundation. It’s just a matter of time until the ruler is in all school systems. Just go to radiusruler.com and copy, paste, print and build your own Radius Ruler. It’s FREE to all teachers and students.

dial-mag

The Third Tool for Measuring    

The radius ruler is an innovation so fundamental, it’s only comparable to something like the protractor as a basic measuring device.  We want to bring the radius ruler to American students as a learning tool because it’s just as significant as the ruler and protractor in helping them learn the basics of math.  It compliments the ruler and protractor by covering that part of the basics they don’t cover.

            From Cartesian and Polar coordinates and from math generally, it’s clear that some sense of length, angle, and radius are key to students understanding the basic concepts.  Children aren’t born knowing anything about this, and concepts of length, angle, and radius are abstract ideas initially.  They don’t have any sense of inches or degrees, let alone the roundness of a corner called radius.

            Educators found that children learn best when more of their 5 senses are part of the learning process.  They gave students a ruler and protractor, and had them make measurements.  The length measurement required taking the ruler in hand, having to concentrate on using eye-hand coordination to line the ruler up with the thing to be measured, and then interpret the graduated scale on the ruler to read the measurement.  The hands-on experience from making the length measurements gives them the experience required to develop a sense of length.  The same is true with using a protractor for making angle measurements to develop a sense of angle.  The significant benefit from this approach is well known.

            Although greatly improved, children still struggle with the basic concepts because they still struggle with the concept of radius.  Like the 3 legs of a stool, understanding math requires some sense of all three of these basics (length, angle, and radius).  Children still struggle because there wasn’t anything comparable to the ruler and protractor for that hands-on experience with radius (until now).  This basic innovation means students can now get the significant benefit from using a radius ruler for making radius measurements to develop a sense of radius.

            We know from talking to some educators we are right about the benefit of this to students.  This is an American innovation that will be manufactured only in America.  We want to bring this to American students to give them a leg up in understanding the basics of math.  The educational version will be made from thick paper like what we sent you, and this form is accurate enough for teaching purposes, but cheap enough to make sure every student can benefit from it.

            Any help you could give us, weather by pointing us in the right direction, suggesting people/groups we should contact, or anything else to aid in this pursuit would be appreciated.